Teacher Effectiveness Reporting

Research indicates the number one influence on student learning in a school is the teacher. Therefore, the 2017 ESSA legislation requires states to report if there is equity in distribution of quality teachers in the state between high poverty and high minority schools and the rest of the schools. To determine equity, each state must report to the U.S. Department of Education (USDE) a comparison of the number of “ineffective” teachers between high poverty schools and low poverty schools and high minority schools and low minority schools (Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act Sec. 2104. [20 U.S.C. 6614] Reporting). North Dakota is not going to break out the report by teachers, but rather by teaching. Using ineffective teaching data based on the evaluation models, the NDDPI will determine an ineffective teacher equivalent.

 

Contact the Office of School Approval & Opportunity at (701) 328-2755 for additional information.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Why are school districts expected to report teacher evaluation information to the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction (NDDPI)?

Research indicates the number one influence on student learning in a school is the teacher. Therefore, the 2017 ESSA legislation requires states to report if there is equity in distribution of quality teachers in the state between high poverty and high minority schools and the rest of the schools. To determine equity, each state must report to the U.S. Department of Education (USDE) a comparison of the number of “ineffective” teachers between high poverty schools and low poverty schools and high minority schools and low minority schools. 

North Dakota is not going to break out the report by teachers, but rather by teaching. Using ineffective teaching data based on the evaluation models, the NDDPI will determine an ineffective teacher equivalent.

 
Why has North Dakota decided to report out on “ineffective teaching” versus “ineffective teachers”?

North Dakota’s belief is that the primary purpose of the teacher and principal evaluation system is to provide growth. Putting a high level of emphasis on the rating of the teacher would undermine the primary purpose of the teacher supervision process. Research is clear, the higher the stakes on a rating, the greater the chance the rating will be less honest. Having teachers listed as ineffective would create high stakes on ratings and negatively impact the focus on growth within the evaluation system.

 
How will North Dakota determine the number of “ineffective” teaching to report to USDE?

Ineffective teaching will be considered any rating of any element or component on any of the aligned teacher evaluation models at the rating Level One or Level Zero.

  • In the Danielson Model, Level One is defined as “Unsatisfactory”.
  • In the Marshall Model, Level One is defined as “Does Not Meet Standards”.
  • In the Marzano Model, Level One is defined as “Beginning” and Level Zero is defined as “Not Using”.
  • In the McREL Model, Level One is defined as “Developing” and Level Zero is defined as “Not Demonstrated”.

 
What is the formula to calculate the percent of “ineffective teaching”?

A.  Number of teachers rated for the year.

B.  Total number of elements/components implemented and rated during the year on certified teachers.

C.  Number of teachers rated X number of elements/components rated = Total Possible Ratings. A X B = C    

D.  Number of elements/components rated at the Level One for all teachers evaluated.

E.  Number of Level One Ratings/Total Possible Ratings = Percent of Level One Ratings D / C = % Level One Ratings             

F.  Percent of Level One Ratings X Total Number of Teachers = Teacher Equivalent Number 

 

EXAMPLE:

A. Number of teachers rated for the year. 20

B. Total number of elements implemented and rated during the school year on certified teachers. 40

C. Number of teachers rated X number of elements rated = Total Possible Ratings.   20 X 40 = 800

D. Number of elements rated at the Level One for all teachers evaluated. 48

E. Number of Level One Ratings/Total Possible Ratings = Percent of Level One Ratings 48/800 = 6%

F. Percent of Level One Ratings X Total Number of Teachers = Teacher Equivalent Number 

6% X 20 = 1.2 teacher equivalents                   

 

What if all the elements within the evaluation model are rated, but the focus is on only 10? For example, there may be 60 total elements, and all are rated, but only 10 are the focus for the year.

All elements that are rated are to be reported. If all 60 elements are rated, then all would be counted and included in the report.

 
What if all new teachers in their first year are rated on 20 elements, and all other teachers rated on the full model of 60 elements?

The total elements rated would be counted. In this example, the number of elements possible is (20 X number of first year teachers) + (60 X the rest of the teaching staff) = Total Elements Possible.

 
Should all the elements/components be recorded for this purpose? Some elements/components are related to professional responsibilities, and not directly to classroom performance.

Yes. While professional responsibilities may not always be directly related to impact on classroom performance, they do impact student learning indirectly and should be counted the same as the elements related to classroom instruction.

 
Teacher Attendance is one of the elements in the Marshall Model. Should it be counted as one of the elements in the total possible ratings and in the Level One rating?

Yes. Teachers presence in the classroom have a direct impact on student learning and should be counted the same as every other element.

 
How can there be a comparison between different teacher evaluation models in the state?

Level One performance in every model is considered the lowest level and not meeting standards. Some models use a zero score. The zero scores should be included when counting Level One ratings. For example, if a teacher has one rating of Level 0 and two ratings of Level One, the total Level One count would be 3.

 
Will this data be reported out on the local school ESSA dashboard?

No. This data will be reported at the state level only. It will not be reported on the school ESSA dashboard.

 
Will data be collected on the percentage of teachers who are rated as “ineffective” by school for state purposes and published?

No. The number of ineffective teaching elements/components will be collected rather than the number of ineffective teachers.

 
Is the data reported by school or school district?

This data is collected at the school level.

 

When does this data get collected and how?

The data is collected using the Personnel Report in the STARS system at the end of each school year and is due by June 30. The 2017-2018 school year data is the baseline data.

 
Will data be collected on the percent of teaching at Levels Two, Three, and Four?

Yes. Data on all evaluation levels will be collected to assist with professional development planning. In addition, there are advantages for schools/districts to have conversations on areas of strength and areas for improvement. However, only the Level One data will be reported to the USDE.

 
Will the data be collected by the element/component level, indicating which areas are the highest and which are the lowest for schools? 

No. However, this might provide valuable data to school districts, REAs, and the state for professional development purposes if this data is collected and aggregated up to the state level by the different evaluation models. This makes sense and an effort to collect data and share with appropriate support systems may be made.

 

Will this data be collected on principals?

No, not at the present time. School districts with multiple principals are encouraged to collect this data.

 

What are the requirements under ESSA for teacher reporting?

The Elementary Secondary Education Act (ESEA) as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act says each state must describe how low-income and minority children are not served at disproportionate rates by ineffective, out-of-field, or inexperienced teachers, and the measures that will be used to evaluate and publicly report this data [ESEA section 111(g)(1)(B)]. Per the USDE approval letter (September 1, 2017 and January 8, 2019), the North Dakota ESSA plan describes a plan to collect the data necessary to meet this requirement for ineffective teachers.

 
What is considered a high poverty school?

Title I definition is used to identify a high poverty school, which is the percent of free and reduced students at or above 40%.


What is considered a high minority school?

NDDPI is awaiting more information from the USDE regarding this definition.

 
How does this fit into AdvancED?

Within the AdvancED process, Standard 1.6, Level Four states the data from the supervision and evaluation process will be used to inform professional practice. Having a system to collect all the ratings to provide an overall picture of the teaching staff provides the data that can provide direction for professional development. 

Level Four: The institution has written supervision and evaluation processes for staff members that include specific criteria and models for effective performance and use the results to inform and improve professional practice and student performance.

 

 

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