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Benefit Type: Housing Assistance

Community Action Agencies were originally established under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 to fight America's War on Poverty. Today, there are seven Community Action Agencies in North Dakota who provide programs and services in all 53 counties. By combing local, state, private, and federal resources the Community Action Agencies enable low- and moderate-income people of all ages to secure the opportunities they need to obtain and maintain self-sufficiency.

About Habitat for Humanity:

Lake Agassiz Habitat for Humanity (LAHFH) is a locally run affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International, a non-profit Christian organization with the goal of eliminating poverty housing and homelessness. Our affiliate was established in 1991 to serve the families of Cass and Clay counties.

The purpose of this assistance is to provide monies to give aid and comfort to veterans [as defined in NDCC 37-14] and their spouses, or un-remarried widow/widowers of eligible veterans.

The individual must have an unmet need of dental and/or denture work (routine and maintenance procedures are not covered), optical, hearing, transportation (for medical treatment), special needs for medical reasons, housing deposit, other emergency needs approved by the Commissioner of Veterans Affairs. 

The VA provides a home loan guaranty benefit and other housing-related programs to help you buy, build, repair, retain, or adapt a home for your own personal occupancy.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) states that the nation’s homeless veterans are predominantly male, with roughly 8% being female. The majority are single; live in urban areas; and suffer from mental illness, alcohol and/or substance abuse, or co-occurring disorders. About 13% of the adult homeless population are veterans.

Roughly 40% of all homeless veterans are African American or Hispanic, despite only accounting for 10.4% and 3.4% of the U.S. veteran population, respectively.

Homeless veterans are younger on average than the total veteran population. Approximately 9% are between the ages of 18 and 30, and 41% are between the ages of 31 and 50. Conversely, only 5% of all veterans are between the ages of 18 and 30, and less than 23% are between 31 and 50.

America’s homeless veterans have served in World War II, the Korean War, Cold War, Vietnam War, Grenada, Panama, Lebanon, Persian Gulf War, Afghanistan and Iraq (OEF/OIF), and the military’s anti-drug cultivation efforts in South America. Nearly half of homeless veterans served during the Vietnam era. Two-thirds served our country for at least three years, and one-third were stationed in a war zone.

About 1.4 million other veterans, meanwhile, are considered at risk of homelessness due to poverty, lack of support networks, and dismal living conditions in overcrowded or substandard housing.

Military Warriors Support Foundation awards mortgage-free homes to wounded heroes injured during combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. The homes are for families who have severe and/or unique circumstances due to their injuries received while serving our country. In addition to the home, the families will receive 3 years of family and financial mentoring.

Who Can Apply:

1. Must be a combat wounded veteran (Purple Heart recipient preferred) of Operation Enduring freedom and/or Operation Iraqi Freedom.

VA provides grants to Servicemembers and Veterans with certain permanent and total service-connected disabilities to help purchase or construct an adapted home, or modify an existing home to accommodate a disability. Two grant programs exist: the Specially Adapted Housing (SAH) grant and the Special Housing Adaptation (SHA) grant.

The programs and resources listed below help homeowners with home repairs and improvements.

Our Heroes Dreams has teamed up with Home Depot and other organizations to help provide needed repairs to our veteran’s homes. Providing these home repairs helps to let our veterans live more comfortable and puts lets stress on a veteran when they can’t afford that new roof or needed repairs.

Visit the website for more information.

Provides critical repairs and renovations for low-income homeowners across the United States, and has done so for almost 25 years.  They believe that Every Person Deserves to Live in a Safe and Healthy Home.

Salvation Army’s Supportive Services for Veterans Families (SSVF)

The Salvation Army in working with a grant through the North Dakota Coalition for the Homeless People has funding assistance for North Dakota Veterans who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.

Purpose: The Very Low-Income Housing Repair program provides loans and grants to very low-income homeowners to repair, improve, or modernize their dwellings or to remove health and safety hazards.

Discharge Requests

Most Veteran’s benefits require that applicants provide a copy of their Form DD 214 or discharge record, which is evidence of their veteran status. This is an important document and must be safeguarded. In the State of North Dakota separation documents are considered confidential and privileged NDCC 37-18-11 (13). National Guard members may receive a NGB22 and /or NGB23 upon obtaining 20 years of satisfactory service (20 year letter).