PROJECT FOOD, LAND & PEOPLE SETS SUMMER TEACHER WORKSHOPS

BISMARCK – Project Food, Land and People (FLP), a widely used program for elementary and secondary students to learn about agriculture, is now offering teachers the FLP Institute, a two- and four-day workshop.

“The FLP Institute provides teachers with a more intensive learning experience,” said Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring. “The institute will focus on FLP lessons, but give participants many more hands on activities, tours and free materials.”

The FLP Institute will be held June 7-10 at North Dakota State University. Two-day participants will earn one 600 level credit; four-day participants earn two 600 level credits.

Registration is $50 for 2 days and $85 for four days, plus $50 per credit. Housing is available through NDSU.

Also available are the annual FLP summer workshops. Three different workshops are being offered this year:

  • FLP I is the traditional workshop, an introduction to across the curriculum lessons including a field trip.
     
  • FLP II focuses on land and water conservation curriculum with many hands-on activities.
     
  • FLP III focuses on food/nutrition and consumer science lessons.

The workshops are scheduled:

FLP I

June 14-15

Bismarck

FLP III

July 19-20

Jamestown

FLP II

July 26-27

Fargo

FLP I

Aug. 9-10

Dickinson

First time participants are encouraged to register early for a chance at stipends to cover the credit fee. Registration for June dates will close on May 25. Registration for other dates closes July 1. A minimum of 10 participants required by the registration deadlines.

Online registration and more information are available at www.ndfb.org/edusafe (click on “Food, Land and People”).

Project Food, Land and People provides 55 pre-kindergarten through 12th grade lessons to help students better understand the interrelationship of the environment, agriculture and people of the world. The hands-on lessons are objective in content and promote development of critical thinking.

“This program has helped thousands of North Dakota young people, especially those living in cities, better understand the role of agriculture in their state and in their lives,” Goehring said. “It helps them connect with our farms and ranches.”