EAB Awareness Week

May 24-30, 2022

 

Monday 5/30

 

Diversification

 

Trees provide a great return on investment. Shelterbelts protect farmsteads, roadways and communities throughout the state. Trees beautify individual yards, providing wildlife habitat, shade, and produce oxygen. They’re amazing. Green ash is under threat from EAB, and it’s time to diversify those shelterbelts, communities and yards. A surprising number of tree species and cultivars are adapted to North Dakota sites. Check out the ND Tree Selector at: https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/tree-selector.

 

 

For more information, please see the following links

 

Sunday 5/29

 

EAB cold adaptation

 

How cold does it need to be before EAB can no longer survive? New information shows that there is enough variation in the physical traits of individual EAB to allow a portion of the beetles to survive the extreme cold conditions of Winnipeg. Prior to this recent finding, it was believed that temperatures reaching -30°F would kill 98% of the EAB. So, will ND’s cold climate help spare us from EAB?

 

 

For more information, please see the following links

 

Saturday 5/28

 

The ecological influence of EAB (woodpeckers)

 

Did you know that woodpecker behavior could help us find EAB? It has been observed that in EAB-infested forests, bark-foraging birds like woodpeckers will forage more heavily on ash trees than other species. This is the principle that allows managers to use the signs of bark-foraging birds on ash trees to identify locations that may contain EAB.

 

 

For more information, please see the following links:

 

Friday 5/27

 

General decline of ash trees

 

North Dakota’s a tough place for trees. Summer temperatures reach at least 90°F, while winter cold can get to -30°F or even -40°F. Add in extremes of moisture, plus native insect and disease pests, and it’s no wonder that so many ash trees are in a general state of decline. 

A combined team from the ND Forest Service, ND Department of Agriculture and NDSU Extension have been working together for many years, searching for EAB in our state. Fortunately, we haven’t found it.  Instead, we’ve found trees that have been infested with redheaded ash borer, ash bark beetle, and numerous other native pests. 

 

 

Despite the numerous woodpecker holes and overall poor health of this ash tree, it was not infested with EAB. Instead, native insect pests such as redheaded ash borer and ash bark beetle combined with a tough environment, to send this tree into its final decline.

 

Thursday 5/26

 

North Dakota Regulation

 

Today’s topic for EAB Awareness Week is regulations. Yesterday we mentioned how EAB could easily be introduced in a bundle of firewood. Movement of firewood is restricted by a quarantine, or a regulation that prevents movement of potentially infested material from an infested area to a non-infested area. EAB was federally deregulated in 2021; however, state regulations were enacted to help prevent the spread of EAB into North Dakota. These regulations restrict movement of ash trees, firewood and other ash-related products from quarantined areas.

 

For more information, please see the following links:

 

 

Friday 5/27

 

General decline of ash trees

 

North Dakota’s a tough place for trees. Summer temperatures reach at least 90°F, while winter cold can get to -30°F or even -40°F. Add in extremes of moisture, plus native insect and disease pests, and it’s no wonder that so many ash trees are in a general state of decline. 

A combined team from the ND Forest Service, ND Department of Agriculture and NDSU Extension have been working together for many years, searching for EAB in our state. Fortunately, we haven’t found it.  Instead, we’ve found trees that have been infested with redheaded ash borer, ash bark beetle, and numerous other native pests. 

 

 

Despite the numerous woodpecker holes and overall poor health of this ash tree, it was not infested with EAB. Instead, native insect pests such as redheaded ash borer and ash bark beetle combined with a tough environment, to send this tree into its final decline.

 

Thursday 5/26

 

North Dakota Regulation

 

Today’s topic for EAB Awareness Week is regulations. Yesterday we mentioned how EAB could easily be introduced in a bundle of firewood. Movement of firewood is restricted by a quarantine, or a regulation that prevents movement of potentially infested material from an infested area to a non-infested area. EAB was federally deregulated in 2021; however, state regulations were enacted to help prevent the spread of EAB into North Dakota. These regulations restrict movement of ash trees, firewood and other ash-related products from quarantined areas.

 

For more information, please see the following links:

 

 

Wednesday 5/25

 

Distribution and Spread

 

How close is emerald ash borer? Currently EAB is within 70 miles of North Dakota’s borders. While EAB spread appears to be progressing more slowly in recent years, all it would take is an infested bundle of firewood to quickly bring EAB within our borders. This visual shows the spread since 2002.

 

For more information, please see the following links:

 

 

Tuesday 5/24

 

The importance of not moving firewood

 

Do you know the most likely way for EAB to spread? Through our behavior! Transporting firewood that is harboring this bark boring insect drastically accelerates the spread of EAB. So, make sure you burn firewood where you buy it, or otherwise purchase firewood that has been certified for sale.

 

For more information, please see the following links:

 

Monday 5/23 (Preview)

 

Signs and Symptoms of EAB

 

May 24-30, 2022, is Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week in North Dakota, and the ND Department of Agriculture, ND Forest Service and NDSU Extension are working together to increase awareness about the threat that this pest poses to our state’s forest resources.

We’ve been searching for EAB in North Dakota for many years, and all the trees that we’ve investigated have been damaged by native insect and disease pests. While woodpecker damage and an overall state of decline are symptoms of EAB, many other pests can cause poor tree health. For EAB, we specifically look for D-shaped exit holes on the bark of the smaller branches and stems, and for serpentine feeding galleries underneath the bark. 

 

For more information, please see the following links:

 

 

For more information, or report potential EAB findings, please contact one of the following: