HIV/AIDS Education

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Although North Dakota remains the state with the fewest HIV infections in the United States, the number of infections steadily increases and the behaviors that transmit the disease are still present. North Dakota state law requires that all students be educated concerning significant contagious disease. The Department of Public Instruction recommends this education be a part of a health education curriculum. Instructional programs provide information about significant contagious diseases, methods of transmission, the means of protecting against contracting the diseases, the use of universal precautions, and prevention appropriate to specified grade levels. Instruction begins in Kindergarten and continues through Grade 12.
 

School Requirements for North Dakota Schools
Is HIV/AIDS education necessary in North Dakota?
Yes.  Although North Dakota remains the state with the fewest HIV infections in the U.S., the number of infections is steadily increasing and the behaviors that transmit the disease are present.

What does the North Dakota law say about school district policy on HIV/AIDS?
North Dakota Century Code 23-07-16.1 requires each school district to adopt a policy regarding how they will handle children in the school district, employees of the school district, or independent contractors with the school district who have contracted a significant contagious disease. See Model North Dakota School Board Association policy.

What does the North Dakota law say about educating students on HIV/AIDS?
North Dakota Administrative Code 33-06-05.6-01 requires all students, employees of the school district and independent contractors be educated concerning significant contagious disease.