Baesler Invites North Dakotans To See Education Reform Documentary

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For Immediate Release
Friday, Aug. 26, 2016
Contact: Dale Wetzel, Public Information Specialist
Office 701-328-2247
Cell: 701-400-8557
Email:  dewetzel@nd.gov

BISMARCK, N.D., Aug. 26, 2016 – School Superintendent Kirsten Baesler is inviting North Dakotans to attend a free showing of “Most Likely to Succeed,” an award-winning, thought-provoking documentary on education reform. It will be shown in seven North Dakota communities over 11 days, from Aug. 29 through Sept. 8.
 
The film presents the argument that American educational practices, which are rooted in traditions more than a century old, need to adjust for the needs of today’s students. Commentators in the film say the school model hasn’t changed as the world economy shifts and traditional white- and blue-collar jobs disappear, and that these trends could produce chronically high levels of unemployment among graduates in the 21st Century.
 
The North Dakota Department of Public Instruction, the Greater North Dakota Chamber and North Dakota United are hosting the showings. Each one will be followed by an audience question-and-answer session of the issues raised by the film.
 
Ted Dintersmith, a venture capitalist and education reform advocate who is the film’s executive producer, will be present at each showing and will take questions afterward. Baesler will participate in the Q&A in Bismarck, Dickinson and Watford City.
 
The film’s North Dakota schedule is listed below. All showings will begin at 6 p.m. local time. The film lasts about 1½ hours, and audience discussion afterward usually lasts until 9 p.m.
 
The film is being shown at these locations. It has not been generally released to the public, and is not yet available on pay-per-view, streaming services or DVD, so this is your chance to see it!
 
Aug. 29: BISMARCK, North Dakota Heritage Center, 612 E. Boulevard Ave.
Aug. 30: DICKINSON, Dorothy Stickney Auditorium in May Hall, 291 Campus Drive, Dickinson State University campus. (This begins at 6 p.m. Mountain time)
Aug. 31: WATFORD CITY, Watford City High School auditorium, 2313 Wolves Den Parkway.
Sept. 1: MINOT, Minot High School Central Campus Auditorium, 215 First St. SE.
Sept. 6: DEVILS LAKE, Sweetwater Elementary School, 1304 Second Ave. NE.
Sept. 7: GRAND FORKS, Empire Arts Center, 415 Demers Ave.
Sept. 8: WAHPETON, Bremer Bank Theatre, Harry & Ella Stern Cultural Center, North Dakota State College of Science campus, 800 Sixth St. N.
 
Please RSVP at http://ndchamber.chambermaster.com/events and scroll to the venue most convenient for you.
 
Most Likely to Succeed follows students at an innovative school in San Diego.  During the school year, two groups of ninth graders take on ambitious projects that promote critical skills rather than rote memorization. The film addresses the past and future of school, and helps to bring school communities together to reimagine and rethink what our students need for success.  It is a must-see movie, as we grapple with the ramifications of rapid advances in technology, automation and growing levels of income inequality. 
 
Dintersmith, the film’s executive producer, visited all 50 states in the last school year and came away convinced that a few states have the potential to emerge as world leaders in education.  He will discuss why he believes North Dakota can be one of those world leaders in providing kids with outstanding learning experiences. 
 
Dintersmith and Tony Wagner wrote a book that accompanies the movie, “Most Likely To Succeed:  Preparing Our Kids for the Innovation Era,” which is now in its seventh printing. 
 
Here is a link to Mr. Dintersmith’s visit to Fargo last spring http://www.tedxfargo.com/  and some insight from Superintendent Baesler at  https://vimeo.com/142175741.
 
NOTE TO BISMARCK MEDIA: On Tuesday, Aug. 30, Dintersmith will be discussing education innovation with a group of teachers at Legacy High School, 3400 E. Calgary Ave., Bismarck.
The discussion will take place from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in Legacy’s “black box” experimental theater space. The discussion is open to the media.
 
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