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Child Support Division

Services: Enforcement

Contempt of Court

An obligor who intentionally fails to comply with a court order for child support can be held in contempt of court. Consequences for contempt of court can include jail time, fines, license suspension, and an order to complete work activities.

Child Support is required to develop and maintain a list of the names, addresses, and amounts of past-due support owed by obligors who have been held in contempt of court in North Dakota.

If you are an obligor whose name is on the list but you no longer owe past-due support, you can contact Child Support's customer service unit to ask that your name be removed.

List of Obligors Held in Contempt of Court in North Dakota

(This list is updated with additional names approximately every two weeks. The addresses and amounts of past-due support reflect the circumstances at the time the obligors were held in contempt of court.)

A - B (14kb pdf)
G-H-I (15kb pdf)
P-Q-R (11kb pdf)
C - D (12kb pdf)
J-K-L (16kb pdf)
S-T-U (16kb pdf)
E - F (8kb pdf)
M-N-O (14kb pdf)
V-W-X-Y-Z (10kb pdf)

Criminal Nonsupport

An obligor who willfully fails to pay child support as ordered can be prosecuted in a North Dakota court for criminal nonpayment of child support. Criminal nonpayment of child support can be a Class C felony, which has a maximum punishment of five years' imprisonment, a fine of $5,000, or both.

Child Support is required to develop and maintain a list of the names, addresses, and amounts of past-due support owed by obligors who have been found guilty of criminal nonpayment of child support in North Dakota.

(This list is updated with additional names whenever the Child Support Division learns about a prosecution that resulted in a guilty finding. The addresses and amounts of past-due support reflect the circumstances at the time the obligors were found guilty.)

An obligor who willfully fails to pay a support obligation for a child who lives in a different state than the obligor can be prosecuted in federal court for criminal nonpayment of child support under the Deadbeat Parents Punishment Act of 1998. Depending on how long the obligation has remained unpaid or the amount of past-due support, the obligor may be punished by a fine, imprisonment for up to two years, or both.

(This list is updated with additional names whenever the Child Support Division learns about a federal prosecution that resulted in a guilty finding. The addresses and amounts of past-due support reflect information provided by the prosecutor.)

 

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