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Severe Summer Weather Awareness Week: Extreme heat safety tips

Posted on 4/25/2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEContact: Cecily Fong
April 25, 2008701-328-8100


Bismarck, ND - Governor John Hoeven has proclaimed April 21 - 25 Severe Summer Weather Awareness Week. One week, every April, is set aside to focus attention on severe summer weather and the need for the public to be informed and prepared for it.

Severe Summer Weather Awareness Week encourages the public, businesses, schools, and government agencies to focus on being prepared and being informed about severe summer weather.

Severe summer storms can cause damaging winds, hail, rural fires, flash flooding, hazardous materials releases, and power outages. Experience has demonstrated that a well-informed and prepared public can better cope with and survive life threatening severe summer storms.

Extreme Heat*

  • Stay indoors as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun.
  • Stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine if air conditioning is not available.
  • Consider spending the warmest part of the day in public buildings such as libraries, schools, movie theaters, shopping malls, and other community facilities. Circulating air can cool the body by increasing the perspiration rate of evaporation.
  • Eat well-balanced, light, and regular meals. Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to do so by a physician.
  • Drink plenty of water. Persons who have epilepsy or heart, kidney, or liver disease; are on fluid-restricted diets; or have a problem with fluid retention should consult a doctor before increasing liquid intake.
  • Limit intake of alcoholic beverages.
  • Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, and light-colored clothes that cover as much skin as possible.
  • Protect face and head by wearing a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Check on family, friends, and neighbors who do not have air conditioning and who spend much of their time alone.
  • Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles.
  • Avoid strenuous work during the warmest part of the day. Use a buddy system when working in extreme heat, and take frequent breaks.
*Source: www.fema.gov/hazard/heat/heat_during.shtm

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This site updated as of 4/22/2014.