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News Releases

Severe Summer Weather Awareness Week: Be flood smart

Posted on 4/22/2008

flood
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEContact: Cecily Fong
April 22, 2008701-328-8100


Bismarck, ND - Governor John Hoeven has proclaimed April 21 - 25 Severe Summer Weather Awareness Week. One week, every April, is set aside to focus attention on severe summer weather and the need for the public to be informed and prepared for it.

Severe Summer Weather Awareness Week encourages the public, businesses, schools, and government agencies to focus on being prepared and being informed about severe summer weather.

Severe summer storms can cause damaging winds, hail, rural fires, flash flooding, hazardous materials releases and power outages. Experience has demonstrated that a well-informed and prepared public can better cope with and survive life threatening severe summer storms.

Flash Flood* - Turn around, don't drown.
Here's what you can do once flooding has started to keep your family safe:

  • Fill bathtubs, sinks and jugs with clean water in case water becomes contaminated.
  • Listen to a battery-operated radio for the latest storm information.
  • If local authorities instruct you to do so, turn off all utilities at the main power switch and close the main gas valve.
  • If told to evacuate your home, do so immediately.
  • If the waters start to rise inside your house before you have evacuated, retreat to the second floor, the attic, or if necessary, the roof.
  • Floodwaters may carry raw sewage, chemical waste and other disease-spreading substances. If you've come in contact with floodwaters, wash your hands with soap and disinfected water.
  • Avoid walking through floodwaters. As little as six inches of moving water can knock you off your feet.
  • Don't drive through a flooded area. If you come upon a flooded road, turn around and go another way. A car can be carried away by just two feet of flood water.
  • Electric current passes easily through water, so stay away from downed power lines and electrical wires.
  • Animals lose their homes in floods, too. Be aware that even domesticated animals may be confused and unpredictable in a flood situation.
*Source: www.floodsmart.gov

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This site updated as of 8/29/2014.