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Schools and Artists as Learning Teams (SALT) Guidelines, Program Overview, and FAQ’s

To apply for a grant, or for more information, please visit: http://northdakota.cgweb.org.

SALT Grant Program Time Frame/Deadlines

  • Application deadline: Applications must be submitted by April 1 for first year applicants, and August 1 for second and third year applicants.
  • Notification: First year applicants will be notified of funding status by May 1. Second and third year applicants will be notified by September 1.
  • Grant period: Grants begin on October 1 and end June 30.
  • Workshops: All team members are required to attend three professional development workshops during the academic year (classroom activities may not begin until after the initial team workshop):
    • Initial team workshop: Two hour onsite session scheduled in September.
    • Winter workshop: TBA
    • Spring Workshop: TBA

    Team projects: First year classroom projects occur between January and May; second and third year classroom projects occur between October and May.

    Peer coaching: Two peer coach onsite professional development sessions will be determined by the team and peer coaches.

    Sessions and workshops in subsequent years TBD, depending on funding from the state legislature and teamís progress in meeting program criteria.

    Grant Program Overview

    SALT (Schools and Artists as Learning Teams) is a grant program of the North Dakota Council on the Arts (NDCA) that provides funding and peer coaching for research-based, high quality professional development for North Dakota teachers and teaching artists who are committed to working together to improve student achievement by improving their own teaching practices. Teacher/artist teams must be willing to work collaboratively in a process of development and change over the three-year duration of the grant. 

    • A grant award is $6,000 per year. A minimum school match of $1,250 per year is required. The match must underwrite the costs of new activities associated with the proposed SALT project.
    • The grant can be renewed for up to three years, dependent on legislative funding. The length of the grant provides opportunities for teams to stretch and explore what it means to work collaboratively and practice in the classroom what they learn.
    • Peer coaches are assigned to each learning team at the start of the grant period.

    If You Believe ALL Students Can Succeed and:

    • Want to improve your ability to design in-depth, focused, and quality learning experiences for students in and through the arts, that will help all students reach their potential
    • Want to deepen your partnership with a school or artist or arts organization
    • Want to take advantage of significant professional development that is tailored to your needs

    And You are Willing to:

    • Work collaboratively in a process of development and change over the duration of the grant—using Artful Teaching and Learning tools and strategies to plan, implement, and reflect on your project
    • Compensate artists and teachers for planning and reflection time
    • Include peer coaches in functions of the project at your site (for instance, participating in planning meetings, doing a observing a classroom observation activity, attending an exhibit or performance, or facilitating a reflection session)
    • Identify student strengths and needs and work together to amplify strengths and address needs
    • Routinely document, assess, and communicate your work, including completion of a final report

    . . . . then we invite you to apply to be a partner in this program!

    SALT Grant Program Eligibility Requirements

    Eligible applicants must:

    • Be educators in a North Dakota pre-K-12 public school or an independent artist  or be part of a 501(c)3 nonprofit arts organization that works with students during the regular school day.
    • Want to deepen their partnership with a school or North Dakota artist or arts organization.
    • Go beyond the Artist-in-Residence model and start exploring collaborative ways to work in the classroom.
    • Be willing to work collaboratively in a process of professional development and change over the duration of the grant – using the Artful Tools for Teaching and Learning to plan, implement, and reflect on their project.
    • Be willing to participate in three onsite peer coach/NDCA staff professional development sessions.
    • Be willing to attend two program-wide workshops each year.
    • Be willing to compensate the artists on their team for planning and reflection time.
    • Routinely document, assess and communicate their work, including completion of a final report.
    • Manage and expend funds appropriately and within the guidelines of the program.

    SALT Grant Program Criteria for Selection

    Acceptance into the North Dakota SALT program will be awarded on a competitive basis to School/Arts Partner teams that demonstrate the following key elements:

    • Preference will be given if the plan includes a North Dakota artist from the North Dakota Council on the Arts roster.
    • Commitment by all team members (school and arts partner) to innovation, continuous improvement, and SALT program processes.
    • Plan includes how the team will structure planning time.
    • Plan includes ongoing assessment and reflection.
    • Appropriateness of budget.
    • Completeness of application.

    Professional Development Components

    SALT provides artists and educators with ongoing, job-embedded professional development through individualized coaching, workshops, and other resources. The program provides learning opportunities for artists and educators designed to enhance arts-based teaching and learning in the classroom in order to find and kindle the potential in each student.

    Team members commit to:

    • Collaboratively planning, implementing, reflecting on, and assessing standards-based, student-centered learning experiences over the course of their project supported by a peer coach and North Dakota Council on the Arts staff.
    • Engaging in an ongoing process of professional discussion and collaborative inquiry in a “lesson study” or “critical friends” network.

    Teams meet with peer coaches and NDCA staff five times during the grant period:

    • Initial onsite team session with NDCA staff (TBD by team)
    • Winter workshop TBA
    • Spring workshop TBA
    • Two onsite peer coach sessions (TBD by team)

    Coaching

    Each arts team will be assigned at least one peer coach for the duration of the grant. Peer coaches are teachers, artists, and arts administrators who have worked in schools and arts organizations and as independent teaching artists. They provide support for SALT teams and individuals members as they learn and apply artful methods, tools, and strategies in a wide variety of settings.  Peer coaches facilitate and support the following areas of professional development:

    Collaborative Planning

    Planning a collaboration is a process that has many entry points. Some school and arts partner teams are longtime collaborators, others are working together for the first time. Artful planning is a process that takes time. Artists intuitively understand that a lot of planning needs to go into something substantial. Teachers know the value of having plenty of time to plan and prepare their lessons. Planning backwards is an approach that honors both the artistic process and the inquiry process. Planning backwards from a compelling and meaningful destination helps artists and teachers create absorbing, relevant learning experiences through which all learners come to a deep understanding of a subject.  Planning backwards helps build long term collaborations. It can change the way teachers teach and students learn.

    Arts Integration Strategies

    Teams explore what it means to work authentically IN the arts as a means to work more meaningfully THROUGH the arts. This includes naming what kind of support and mutual understanding it takes for artists and educators to collaborate in innovative and nontraditional ways.

    Peer coaches guide team members in ways that allow them to share teaching and learning practices with each other, to discover mentoring and partnering opportunities with other teaching artists, and to build bridges to arts organizations and schools.

    Reflective Protocols

    SALT teams use protocols to facilitate conversations among “critical friends.”  A protocol is a particular set of agreements that guide how a group may function. The SALT program uses protocols developed by Artful Teaching and Learning to guide teams in effective ways to plan, revise and assess their classroom projects; assess student learning; and improve their teaching practice.

    Artful protocols allow practitioners to:

    • Build the skills and culture necessary for collaborative work
    • Create a safe atmosphere for respectful, nonjudgmental dialogue
    • Ensure everyone present has a chance to contribute
    • Make the most of their time
    • Hold in-depth, insightful conversations about teaching and learning

    Critical Friends

    The North Dakota Council on the Arts values innovation and continuous improvement. In the SALT program, NDCA has established an open system of feedback in which SALT teams and team members can learn from each other.

    SALT employs a model called Artist to Artist to explore the “art” of teaching and learning.  Artist to Artist, founded in 2002, began as a cadre of experienced peer coaches acting as critical friends amongst each other. This cadre has grown into a network of individuals, schools, and arts organizations who work in arts education across the states of Minnesota and North Dakota.

    Artist to Artist uses the power of collaborative inquiry to examine the work that artists and teachers do. Participants develop deeper understandings of artists’ and teachers’ planning, instruction, and reflection strategies.

    Through common language, tools, and philosophies the program promotes authentic learning in:

    • arts integration strategies
    • arts education planning and reflection strategies
    • continuous improvement strategies

    Three-Year Program Overview

    SALT grants can be renewed for up to three years depending on legislative funding.  During this time, teams have the opportunity to stretch and explore what it means to work collaboratively and practice in the classroom what they learn.

    Year One: Explore

    • Teams – teachers, artists, coordinators, arts organization representatives, peer coaches – spend time reflecting on and revising their initial application plan.
    • Peer coaches and North Dakota Council on the Arts staff introduce tools and strategies from the Artful Tools for Teaching & Learning handbook to help teams implement high quality learning and to assess and reflect on their efforts.
    • Team members begin to practice being “critical friends” to each other.
    • Based on their original application, teacher(s) and artist(s) collaborate in designing and teaching learning activities in the classroom.
    • Team attends initial onsite team session, winter, and spring planning workshops; and sessions with peer coaches.
    • Peer coach(es) joins team for two on-site professional development sessions that include observation, reflection and assessment, and planning.
    • Team creates a plan for Year Two using the Artful Planner (a tool from the Artful Tools for Teaching & Learning handbook) and building on evidence gathered and lessons learned during Year One.

    Year Two: Refine

    • Team reflects and revises project according to student strengths and gaps, using language, tools and strategies introduced in Year One.
    • Team members continue acting as critical friends to each other and the North Dakota Council on the Arts.
    • Team hones their teaching and reflecting skills by exploring new tools from the Artful Tools for Teaching & Learning handbook [ital] and becoming more adept at using familiar tools.
    • Team attends fall, winter, and spring planning workshops; and meets with peer coaches.
    • Peer coach(es) joins team for two  on-site professional development sessions that include observation, reflection and assessment, and planning.
    • Team creates plan for Year Three using the Artful Planner and building on evidence gathered and lessons learned during Year Two.

    Year Three: Deepen

    • Team meets for initial planning and reflection, deciding how and when to use peer coach support.
    • The language, tools and strategies of design, implementation and reflection are imbedded into each team member’s teaching practice.
    • Team members continue acting as critical friends to each other and to the North Dakota Council on the Arts and serve as critical friends to newer teams when feasible.
    • Team designs and leads a session at the winter and spring workshops.
    • Team reflects how to sustain partnership.

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    Team Members:

    Who is an art partner? An arts partner might be an organization, a performing arts center or an artist in North Dakota.  Arts partners are equal members of the collaborative SALT team.  Each SALT team must include at least one arts partner and may have more than one.  In addition to the arts partner, a team may choose to engage other arts organizations or independent artists to provide services for the project.  We highly encourage teams to include local, community-based arts partners whenever possible.

    Who is a school partner? A school partner is any teacher at a North Dakota pre-K-12 school that works with students during the regular school day.  Each SALT team must include at least two teachers, preferably within the same school. Participating teachers can be classroom teachers or specialists; they should be teachers who are interested in working collaboratively with an arts partner(s).

    What is an anchor organization? The anchor organization is the agency within the partnership that agrees to take responsibility for the distribution of all the funds and agrees to submit all required reporting to the North Dakota Council on the Arts. The anchor organization may be either the school or a nonprofit arts organization within the partnership. The anchor organization is responsible for distributing the entire grant funds, including paying for substitute teachers, buses, invoices from other arts organizations that work in the partnership, and all other costs identified in the grant budget.

    Who is the team coordinator? The team coordinator serves as the primary contact and liaison for the team with their peer coaches and with North Dakota Council on the Arts staff.  The team coordinator must be regularly accessible via e-mail.

    What is a peer coach? Peer coaches are teachers, artists, and arts administrators who have worked in schools and arts organizations and as independent artists; they have rich and varied experience in supporting collaborative partnerships. The SALT program assigns one or two peer coaches to each team at the start of the grant period.

    How many partners should be on a team? There is no perfect number of partners for a SALT team. However, our experience is that a smaller team can work together more effectively than a very large one. If your primary team looks like it will include more than five or six people, please contact a member of the North Dakota Council on the Arts SALT program to discuss your ideas.

    What are the responsibilities of the SALT team members? Team members will attend the initial onsite planning meeting, the winter and spring workshops, and participate in ongoing planning and reflection meetings throughout the course of the grant.

    How can we use the SALT grant funds?

    • Partnership Planning and Reflection – Time for planning and reflection should be a major portion of each applicant’s budget.  We strongly encourage applicants to compensate all professionals for their work time when it occurs at times that are beyond their normal work hours.  It is appropriate to use funds to pay for:
      - Substitutes, if planning will occur during a school day.
      - Teacher extended time.
      - Artist time devoted to planning and reflection.
      - Costs associated with administering and coordinating the SALT collaboration when the anchor organization is a nonprofit partner.
    • Direct work with students – A portion of the SALT grant may be spent to pay for artist preparation time and direct work with the students, particularly for contact time between the artist(s) and students in the classroom.
    • Field Trips and Performances – Some funds may be used for such supplementary expenses as bus transportation, ticket or entry costs, and supplies and materials connected to partnership activities with students.

    What expenditures are not appropriate for SALT funds?

    SALT funds may not be used for:

    • Capital improvement or construction, purchase of capital equipment, purchase of real property or endowments.
    • Permanent purchases such as books, a piano, digital camera, computer or other equipment.
    • Costs associated with fundraising events.
    • Activities that engage in political lobbying, serve the religious socialization of participants or discriminate against persons or groups.

    How do we determine what the school match should cover?

    The school principal or budget officer should work with you to develop the budget proposal for the school match.  Any line item on the budget proposal can be paid with school matching funds, but some fall more easily into a school’s existing budget plans than others.  The school might plan to pay for:

    • Substitute teacher or teacher extended time costs for planning or workshops.
    • Staff development specifically connected to the SALT team’s activities.
    • Office support associated with administration of the program.
    • Artist fees for classroom work or for planning time.
    • Transportation, tickets, or curriculum supplies as needed to fulfill the SALT team’s plans.

    What cannot be used as a match?

    • The costs of existing school arts programs or teaching not directly related to the SALT partnership’s work would not be considered an appropriate match.  For instance, the school may not match SALT dollars with:
    • Regular teacher or administrative salaries.
    • Supplies for everyday classroom instruction.
    • Field trips for visiting performances not directly related to SALT projects.

    Does the school provide the match even if the arts partner is serving as the anchor organization?

    Yes. No matter which agency serves as the anchor and receives the grant, it must be the partner school that provides the matching funds.

    Perpich Center for Arts Education’s Artful Online: Professional Development for Teachers and Teaching Artists - “Resources to help ALL students achieve high academic standards in and through the arts.”

    *SALT models the Minnesota Arts & Schools as Partners (ASAP) grant program which is part of the Perpich Center’s Minnesota Arts Education Network

    ~ SALT Participant PowerPoint Presentations ~

    11-12, Jamestown SALT PowerPoint Presentation Team 1 (in PDF Format) - Jamestown Arts Center and Roosevelt Elementary, 2011-2012 Final Reflection

    11-12, Jamestown SALT PowerPoint Presentation Team 2 (in PDF Format) - Jamestown Arts Center and Roosevelt Elementary, 2011-2012 Final Reflection

    11-12, Bismarck SALT PowerPoint Presentation (in PDF Format) - Roosevelt Elementary, 2011-2012 Final Reflection

    11-12, Bismarck SALT PowerPoint Presentation (in PDF Format) - Sunrise Elementary, 2011-2012 Final Reflection

    10-11, Jamestown SALT PowerPoint Presentation (in PDF Format) - Jamestown Arts Center and Roosevelt Elementary, 2010-2011 Final Reflection

    10-11, Bismarck SALT PowerPoint Presentation (in PDF Format) - Roosevelt Elementary, 2010-2011 Final Reflection

    10-11, Bismarck SALT PowerPoint Presentation (in PDF Format) - Sunrise Elementary, 2010-2011 Final Reflection

    09-10, Bismarck SALT PowerPoint Presentation (in PDF Format) - Roosevelt Elementary, Visual Art & Storytelling 2009-2010 Final Reflection

    09-10, Jamestown SALT PowerPoint Presentation (in PDF format) - Jamestown Arts Center and Gussner Elementary, Creative Writing, Book Making 2009-2010 Final Reflection

    08-09, Mandan SALT PowerPoint Presentation (in PDF Format) - West River Head Start & Dragon Jane Performance Art Company 2008-2009 Final Reflection

    08-09, Bismarck SALT PowerPoint Presentation (in PDF Format) - Roosevelt Elementary, Visual Art & Storytelling 2007-2008 Final Reflection

    08-09, Jamestown SALT PowerPoint Presentation (in PDF format) - Jamestown Arts Center and Gussner Elementary, Creative Writing, Book Making 2008-2009 Final Reflection

    07-08, Bismarck SALT PowerPoint Presentation (in PDF Format) - Riverside Elementary and Roosevelt Elementary, Visual Art & Storytelling 2007-2008 Final Reflection

    07-08, Jamestown SALT PowerPoint Presentation (in PDF format) - Jamestown Arts Center and Gussner Elementary, Creative Writing, Book Making 2007-2008 Final Reflection

    06-07, Bismarck SALT PowerPoint Presentation (in PDF format) - Riverside Elementary and Roosevelt Elementary 2006-2007 Final Reflection

    06-07, Jamestown SALT PowerPoint Presentation (in PDF format) - Jamestown Arts Center and Gussner Elementary, Creative Writing, Book Making 2006-2007 Final Reflection

    Assistance

    Contact the Arts in Education Director at rengelman@nd.gov or (701) 328-7593 with any questions.

 
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